Being confused or curious about items listed on our menu? New comers to Chinese food culture can be confused by the jargon. Here is our glossary of common terms. Look them up for your greater food adventure!

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Bean Curd:
Called also tofu. a soft vegetable cheese prepared by treating soybean milk with coagulants (as magnesium chloride or dilute acids).
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Char Sue:
Also spell "Char Siu". Food or meat prepared, or cooked using Chinese Barbecue sauce. Meat (pork, beef, chicken, duck,...etc.) prepared with this popular dish is also called barbecued in some restaurants, partly because of their reddish brown and slightly charred look around the edges.
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Chop Suey:
Thought to date back at least to the mid-19th century, this Chinese-American dish includes small pieces of meat (usually chicken) or shrimp, mushrooms, bean sprouts, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots and onions. These ingredients are cooked together and served over rice. Chop suey doesn't exist as a dish in China (Herbst, 1995, The Food Lover's Companion).
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Chow Mein:
A Chinese-American dish consisting of a combination of stewed vegetables and meat served over fried noodles (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 1996).
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Crab ragu:
Also called "Crab rangoon". A wonderful blend of crab meat, cream cheese and Oriental spices, all wrapped in a Chinese-style wonton wrapper.
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Dim Sum:
Traditional Chinese food consisting of a variety of items (as steamed or fried dumplings, pieces of cooked chicken, and rice balls) served in small portions (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 1996).
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Egg roll:

A usually deep-fried cylindrical casing of thin egg dough, filled with minced vegetables and often bits of meat (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 1996).
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Egg Foo Yung:
A Chinese-American dish made by combining eggs with various foods such as bean sprouts, water chestnuts, scallions, ham, chicken or pork. Small, pancake-size portions are poured into a skillet and fried until golden brown. Egg foo yung can also be made in one large round. It is sometimes topped with a sauce of chicken broth, soy sauce and various seasonings (Herbst, 1995, The Food Lover's Companion).
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Fortune Cookies:
A cookie made from a thin layer of dough folded and baked around a slip of paper bearing a prediction of fortune or a maxim. Like chop suey, is a U.S. invention that is often thought to be from another country. Click the article "Who Invented the Fortune Cookie?" to learn more about the birth of fortune cookies.
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General’s Tsu’s (Tso's) Chicken:
General Tso's Chicken - fried boneless dark-meat chicken, served with vegetables and whole dried red peppers in a sweet-spicy sauce.
Who was "General Tso" and why has he been associated with a chicken dish? There are many speculations about the original invention of this dishes, yet no doubt, General Tso's is a historical, real figure in modern Chinese history. He is historically regarding as General T'sung-t'ang Tso, a Chinese statesman,a general, as well as a an intelligent and able scholar-administrator. Most likely, General Tso liked this chicken dish very much so this common Chinese cuisine was named after him.

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Go Ba: A Chinese pronunciation of some certain type of crunchy fried rice.
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Hunan:
Of, relating to, or being a hot and spicy style of Chinese cooking in the province of Hunan, Mainland China.
Kung Pao:
A spicy Szechuan dish made with diced meat, peanuts and chili peppers. It is named after a Kung Pao or court official.
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Lo Mein:
A Chinese dish consisting of sliced vegetables, soft noodles, and usually meat or shrimp in bite-size pieces stir-fried in a seasoned sauce.
Moo Goo Gai Pan:
A popular Chinese poultry dish that usually cooks with chicken and specific sauce, herbs, and vegetables.
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Mu Shu:
Also spelled as "moo shu" or "moo shoo". "Mu Shu" is a Chinese pronunciation of a type of oriental mushroom. In a menu, it is usually referred to stir-fried Chinese dishes containing shredded pork and wood ears with various veritable and herbal seasonings.
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Sa Char:
A special type of Chinese BBQ sauce, usually is used for stir fried or marinated foods.
Szechuan:
Of, relating to, or being a style of Chinese cooking that is spicy, oily, and especially peppery in the province of Szechuan, Mainland China.
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Ta-Chien:
Dishes that are named after a prestigious Chinese artist, Chang Ta-Chien. The dishes are usually hot and spicy.
Teriyaki:
A Japanese style dish of meat or fish that is grilled or broiled after being soaked in a seasoned soy sauce marinade .
Tofu:
Also called Bean Curd. It is a soft vegetable cheese prepared by treating soybean milk with coagulants (as magnesium chloride or dilute acids).
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Wonton:
A noodle-dough dumpling filled typically with spiced minced pork or other ground meat, usually boiled in soup or fried and eaten as a side dish (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 1996).
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